Author Archives: Eloise Johnston

An inquiry into the delayed publication and suppression of government research

There are many rules and guidelines requiring ministers and civil servants to publish government research promptly and independently. Despite these rules there have been high-profile examples where research conducted or commissioned by government was delayed, modified, and misrepresented – or dropped altogether – apparently because the results were politically inconvenient.   Text and title from […]

Building impact over time: experiences from Zimbabwe

Originally posted on ESRC blog:
Ian Scoones, Director ESRC STEPS Centre, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex – Second prize winner of the ESRC Celebrating Impact Prize for Outstanding International Impact. Generating impact takes time. And this is especially so when research challenges conventional wisdoms and entrenched interests. This is the lesson from our…

The cool down work out?

The new campaign by Sports England This Girl Can encourages women of all ages in England to get exercising, hot and sweaty to get fit and loose weight. So what evidence is there with new claims (Daily Express article from 11 January 2015) that simply cooling our bodies down can help us to burn calories? I Asked […]

A Map of Advocacy across Scotland

This report, the 2013-2014 Advocacy-Map-141114,  is the regular biennial quantitative research into funding and provision of advocacy in Scotland conducted by the Scottish Independent Advocacy Alliance (SIAA). It aims to establish the levels of funding from statutory and non-statutory sources and understand the needs of advocacy partners. As an intern at the SIAA in Edinburgh I […]

The Political Scientist

What role should science have in policy? Should more scientists be politics? Where does evidence fit into it all? Check out this article I wrote in the run up to theGIST Science for Society conference held at the University of Glasgow, November 2014.      

Long-distance relationships- intimacy without proximity?

The globalisation of education and business has struck up a multitude of long-distance relationships. But while it has traditionally been assumed that relationships must be geographically close to develop resilience, mutual understanding and shared meanings, new research now shows that people in long-distance romantic relationships are reporting equal or higher levels of intimacy, widely considered […]

The “invisible epidemic”: non-communicable diseases

This is the first of three articles I wrote in 2013 for an official blog the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies in Colgone titled Governance Across Borders, which explored the development of the global health campaign to challenge non-communicable diseases.  

Cooperation between Australia and Indonesia on people smuggling?